So, after the weekend I spent in Malacca – a 2.5 hour drive from Singapore – here’s my second and third Malacca food recommendations. The quaint, tiny and gorgeous Kocik Kitchen, which serves – what else – Peranakan food, and Jeta Groves with its lovely breakfast offerings of mee siam, laksa, sayur lodeh and more.

Kocik Kitchen

The five of us – me, the girlfriend, my lawyer friends Josh and Cyn and her husband Eugene – had passed by it the day before, but not taken much notice. However, since there was a long queue at the chicken rice ball stall, we took a walk around Jonker Street and ended up back there. Kocik Kitchen is a traditional, old-school place with lots of character to it, that makes it feel like it’s been around for generations.

Peranakan food, Malacca, Kocik Kitchen

The entrance to Kocik Kitchen ©incoherentboy.com

Kocik Kitchen, Peranakan Food, Malacca

Kocik Kitchen along Jalan Tun Cheng Lock in Malacca ©incoherentboy.com

Just like Restoran Peranakan, where we had eaten the day before, it was almost deserted, and had some beautiful and colourful decor.

Kocik Kitchen, Peranakan Food, Malacca

©incoherentboy.com

Kocik Kitchen, Peranakan Food, Malacca

We had a nice seat by the corner, right next to a mirror. So we could watch ourselves eating. Obviously. ©incoherentboy.com

But let’s get on to that lovely, lovely food. Unlike at Restoran Peranakan, we were able to order a la carte dishes, and we chose seven.

Kocik Kitchen, Peranakan Food, Malacca

Sambal sotong or sambal squid – spicy and chewy all at once. ©incoherentboy.com

Kocik Kitchen, Peranakan Food, Malacca

Kueh pie tee – a shredded vegetable mix spooned out into pastry cups. Very nice! ©incoherentboy.com

Kocik Kitchen, Peranakan Food, Malacca

Duck soup – the sourish flavour is, dare I say it, delightful. ©incoherentboy.com

Peranakan food, Malacca, Kocik Kitchen

Ngoh hiang is a kind of sausage roll containing pork and fish. Nice and chewy, and the chilli gave it that extra bite. ©incoherentboy.com

Their otak-otak – a paste made of fish cake and spices and wrapped in banana leaves before being barbequed – was pretty interesting too. The Singapore variety is usually encased in elongated leaves and secured with small toothpicks. This version was exposed and – I think – steamed.

Kocik Kitchen, Peranakan Food, Malacca

Otak-otak – a bit lacking in the spice factor, I felt. ©incoherentboy.com

We also ordered vegetables and the ubiquitous ayam buah keluak, or roughly, chicken with keluak nuts. The girlfriend, who is half-Peranakan, was telling us that she once went to a restaurant where the owner told them not to order the dish with nuts if they weren’t going to eat them. That’s because each nut has to be hollowed out and prepared individually, and the taste is very much an acquired one. I’m not a big fan of it myself, and remember the taste as sort of bitter.

Kocik Kitchen, Peranakan Food, Malacca

Ayam buah keluak – better than Restoran Peranakan’s, I say. ©incoherentboy.com

The final bill came to 100 ringgit (S$40) for our seven dishes, plus rice and drinks. This worked out to S$8 per person – very, very cheap and very, very good.

Kocik Kitchen
Tel: +61 123 774 732 Add: 100 Jalan Tun Tan Cheng Lock, Melaka, Malaysia

Jeta Groves Melaka Nyonya Delights

Peranakan food, Malacca, Jeta Groves

Yet more Peranakan food at Jeta Groves. ©incoherentboy.com

Jeta Groves, Peranakan food, Malacca

The menu at Jeta Groves ©incoherentboy.com

Jeta Groves, Peranakan food, Malacca

Our motley crew: (from L-R) me, the girlfriend Gillian, Josh, Cyn and Eugene. ©incoherentboy.com

Jeta Groves is a little roadside kopitiam about a 10 minute drive from Jonker Street. The decor here wasn’t all that impressive, so I’ll just get straight to the food and let the images tell the story. After all, Malacca food is like the gift that keeps on giving.

Jeta Groves, Peranakan Food, Malacca

Mee siam, or thin rice noodles in spicy, sweet and sour light gravy – very light, yet flavourful. The noodles are also thicker than what you get in Singapore. ©incoherentboy.com

Jeta Groves, Peranakan food, Malacca

Laksa or spicy noodle soup with coconut milk – not quite as rich as the Singapore variety. Think I still prefer Katong laksa. ©incoherentboy.com

Jeta Groves, Peranakan Food, Malacca

Mee rebus or egg noodles in a spicy sweet, curry-like gravy – never been a big fan of it. ©incoherentboy.com

Jeta Groves, Peranakan food, Malacca

Sayur lodeh or vegetables in curry with coconut milk – nice and light. ©incoherentboy.com 

Including drinks, the total damage came to 27 ringgit (S$11), which meant each of us paid just over S$5.

Jeta Groves Melaka Nyonya Delights
Tel: +60 6282 1526, 115 Taman Melaka Raya, Melaka 75000, Malaysia
So that’s that: the end of our Malacca face-stuffing adventures. Stay tuned for the final part of our Malacca trip, in which we encounter an ancient curio store, tricked out trishaws and er a golden statue with huge nipples. In the meantime, allow me to end off with a picture of some awesome Malacca dessert: chendol or shaved ice with coconut milk, palm sugar, a green worm-like jelly and, in this case, red beans.
Jeta Groves, Peranakan food, Malacca

Chendol a.k.a calories personified. ©incoherentboy.com

P.S: You can check out part I of my Malacca food adventure here